Red vs Green vs white

I am constantly receiving the question " Which color light is best". There is a very simple answer to this question " Light color is a personal preference". All colors of light can be used for night hunting, but through my personal experiences I have a preference and I will give you the information from my experiences to help you decide on a color to choose. Please realize that these are my personal experiences and if they do not match your experiences exactly please do not send me hate mail or anything to that effect. 

First I will discuss "Red" Light as this is my personal favorite and only color of light systems that I will use to predator hunt at night. I have tried and tested just about every color of light you could ever imagine to predator hunt with and I always go back to "Red". This is for many different reasons which I will discuss here. First, "Red" light will effect your personal eye sight night vision the LEAST of all colors that I have tried. Eye fatigue will be less which will let you stay on calling stands longer (very helpful when calling coyote and bobcat). Second, "Red" light has proven to be the most calming color having the LEAST effect on the way animals respond to the call. Animals responding to the call under most circumstances respond as if they do not even know that they are in a light.  

Now lets move on to "Green" light. The human eye can pick up contrast of "Green" light very well. This contrast helps to see darker animals(such as wild hogs) better than "Red" light and hogs do not seem to be bothered by the "Green" light. From my personal experiences though "Green" light makes predatory animals very uneasy and they either start moving, pacing or runaway when I hit them with "Green" light.


Lastly I will discuss "White" light as this would personally be my last choice of color to use for night hunting. With "White" light The human eye can see the best, but it also effects and temporarily ruins your peripheral night vision while the light is on. You will be able to identify predators at much further of a distance with "White" light. This extra distance is a good thing though, because from my experience you will need it as with "White" light predators will either hang up at a great distance or be running away when hit with "White" light. I personally have never had a predator act calm and keep coming to the call when hit with "White" light. 

This information is a reflection of my personal views and opinions based on many hours in the field. I hope this information will help answer your questions about which light color to use.

Jeremiah Weber
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